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IN THIS ISSUE 19_11.14.2007
CONTENTS:
NEWS:
Money Talks for Glass House Walks
At Deadline
Riverside Riverwalk; A Landmark Day; Under New Management
Endless Fascination
The Kiesler Foundation in Vienna turns ten
Solar Decathlon won by louver-loving Germans
Hamilton's house to find greener surroundings
Studio Visit: Lyn Rice Architects
Long Island University's downtown Brooklyn campus transformed
Open: Cafe
Frank White
Up On the Roof
Friends of Hudson Square organize a charrette
In Detail: 110 Livingston Street
Beyer Blinder Belle with Ismael Leyva Architects and Robert Silman Associates
Sweet & Vicious
Advisory group chides MTA for fiscal sweet tooth
Kisho Kurokawa, 1934-2007
Treasure PATH
Port Authority spends $1.3 billion to improve aging rail system
Unveiled: Kagan house
A Practiced Hand
NEA names mayor, UVA professor to design directorship
As the World Turns
Wolf Prix turns new-car pick-up into performance art
Open: Restaurant
Brasserie 44 at the Royalton Hotel
Unlucky 7
Cost overruns may force MTA to drop midpoint station in Hudson Yards extension
Recharging the Battery Maritime Museum
Addition will bring new life, luxury hotel to derelict waterfront building
Schematic plans for new esplanade make maritime advocates fear for lack of boating facilities
Explosive New House for UES
LPC approves modern townhouse on Dynamite Doc's site
FEATURES:
The bad news about New York City's infrastructure is that much of it is in serious need of repair or replacement. The good news? Fixing our infrastructure is the surest way to fix our environment. New York has joined the ranks of cities that know it's not just about recycling -- the new ideas in sustainability are civic in scope. By Alec Appelbaum.
Measuring Green
Everybody wants a green building these days, and the words sustainable, recycled, and carbon footprint have become valuable marketing tools for new developments. But what, exactly, does all of this mean, and who defines it? The American building industry has basically adopted the standards set by the United States Green Building Council, and while it's the dominant measure, LEED is not alone. Sarah F. Cox asks how they stack up.
Sustainable Stuff
With manufacturers viewing the world through green-tinted glasses, ecofriendly products for architects are available at every stage of a project from specifying a concrete that eats smog to getting to the job site on a compact bicycle.
REVIEWS:
Back to the Future
New York Modern
Power Structure
Architecture of Authority
Classical Modernism
An Architect's Vision: P. A. Sakellarios
Protest: Peggy Deamer
Sour Kiwis
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