Weekend Edition: D.C.'s newest museum, election analysis, and more

Roundup

Weekend Edition: D.C.'s newest museum, election analysis, and more

D.C.'s newest museum, the National Law Enforcement Museum recently opened, and AN took a look. (Courtesy National Law Enforcement Museum)

Missed some of our articles, tweets, or Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy!

Photo of the National Law Enforcement Museum
Located underneath the plaza of the historic District of Columbia Courthouse, the new National Law Enforcement Museum is marked solely by two mirrored glass pavilions designed by Davis Buckley Architects and Planners. (Courtesy National Law Enforcement Museum)

D.C.’s newest museum goes underground to explore the American police system

The new National Law Enforcement Museum in Washington, D.C., opened to the public in mid-October and teaches civilians what it’s like to be police officer.

(Courtesy Habitat for Humanity of Collier County)
A lush preserve along with lakes and other plots of land already separate the upcoming Regal Acres II from adjacent neighborhoods, but local residents worry about their privacy. (Courtesy Habitat for Humanity of Collier County)

Florida residents demand border wall around Habitat for Humanity housing

Habitat for Humanity announced that an upcoming affordable housing development in East Naples, Florida, will have to be built with a concrete border wall.

Long Island City and Manhattan from Sunnyside, one of the neighborhoods expected to face rent increases if the HQ2 plans bear out.
Long Island City and Manhattan from Sunnyside, one of the neighborhoods expected to face rent increases if the HQ2 plans bear out. (Jonathan Hilburg)

Amazon to split HQ2 between New York and Virginia, but can they handle it?

News of a Crystal City Amazon headquarters may have been premature; it now seems the tech giant is looking at Long Island City as well.

The U.S. Capitol Building at night
The 2018 midterms saw voters go to the ballot over a range of initiatives and politicians that could have a major effect on work for architects and urbanists. (Martin Falbisoner/Wikipedia)

What did the 2018 midterms mean for East Coast architects?

Let out a sigh of relief; the 2018 midterm elections are over, and voters passed judgment up and down the Eastern Seaboard on a wave of measures.

San Francisco skyline
Western states voted on a series of architecture, urbanism, and environment-related ballot initiatives with mixed results. (Hardik Pandya)

West Coast sees big wins (and losses) in architecture and urbanism ballot initiatives

As Democratic voters retook the House of Representatives and key gubernatorial seats, a series of initiatives saw mixed results in western states.

That’s all. See you Monday.

 

CLOSE AD ×