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Second phase of Anita May Rosenstein Campus set to open this summer

GOING THROUGH PHASES

Second phase of Anita May Rosenstein Campus set to open this summer

The six-story senior housing building will contain 98 units facing Las Palmas Avenue. (Courtesy LGBT Center)

Eight months after the first phase of the Leong Leong and Killefer Flammang Architects (KFA)-designed Anita May Rosenstein LGBT Center in Los Angeles was completed, the second phase of the project, named The McCadden Campus, has recently begun construction. KFA is the executive architect and is overseeing their construction in collaboration with Thomas Safran & Associates, an  affordable housing developer and property management company.

While the first phase brought much-needed facilities to the organization—including a new senior community center and youth academy, administrative offices, a retail space, and several cultural events spaces—the second phase will facilitate even more in3tergenerational engagement.That includes the addition of a five-story structure for 98 affordable housing units for seniors, and a four-story structure with an additional 25 studios reserved for youth housing, both of which are designed to accommodate residents with mobility and hearing and/or vision disabilities. “The Anita May Rosenstein Campus,” explained Dominic Leong of Leong Leong, “is a new type of social infrastructure for the LGBTQ community that synthesizes social services and affordable housing into a porous urban campus.”

From the outside, the two buildings of the second phase seem to be more restrained in their design than those of the first. The curved senior housing building stretches across the north end of the campus to provide views of the Hollywood Hills, while the narrow, boxy youth housing structure is sited across the street on North McCadden Place, to maintain a connection to The Village at Ed Gould Plaza, another facility owned by the center that houses several community-oriented event spaces.

Rendering of a white, boxy building with extruding window frames
The five-story youth housing building is among the most aesthetically-restrained buildings on the center’s four-acre campus. (Courtesy LGBT Center)

Altogether, the $141 million campus will connect multiple programs and community-based events across four acres for the roughly 42,000 clients for which the center provides services each month. “Inspired by the mission of the Center,” Leong added, “the architecture is a cohesive mosaic of identities and programs rather than a singular iconic gesture. With a series of internal courtyards and a new public plaza, the campus proactively interfaces with the city while also creating a sanctuary for the community within.”

A portion of phase two will be ready for occupancy by Summer 2020.