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Mayor Bill de Blasio announces plan to protect New York City tenants

Tenants’ rights are top of mind in New York City right now in a big way. As affordable housing stock increases throughout the five boroughs, it seems as though the city government is taking a lead on ensuring the safety and financial wellbeing of local residents. Today in his sixth annual State of the City […]

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Mayor Bill de Blasio appoints architect Laurie Hawkinson to the Public Design Commission

Earlier this week, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced the appointment of Laurie Hawkinson, a partner at Smith-Miller + Hawkinson Architects to the Public Design Commission, New York City’s design review agency. “For this city to lead in the 21st century, this city must be designed for the 21st century,” said Mayor de Blasio in a statement. […]

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Wait, what? New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has never been on the High Line

When the final phase of the High Line opened in September, Mayor de Blasio was not there to celebrate—neither was his Parks Commissioner Mitchell Silver, reported the New York Times. The mayor was off to Pittsburgh that day and Silver apparently had a scheduling conflict so deputies for both men were sent instead. But if […]

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New York Mayor Bill de Blasio Unveils “Vision Zero Action Plan”

After promising to “end the tragic and unacceptable rash of pedestrian deaths” in his State of the City speech, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has officially unveiled his “Vision Zero Action Plan.” On Manhattan’s Upper West Side, near an area where three pedestrians have been killed in the past month, the mayor promised […]

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New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio Appoints Housing Team

Over the weekend, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced four key appointments to his housing team. The mayor selected Shola Olatoye—a former vice president at the affordable housing non-profit Enterprise Community Partners—to chair the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA). He also announced that Cecil House will stay on as the authority’s General […]

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New York City’s surfeit of office space will survive the COVID-19 crisis, but will look a little different on the other side

On March 11, 2020, Edge, a $36-per-head cantilevered sky-deck attraction on the 100th floor of 30 Hudson Yards, opened to literal fanfare. Early that morning, a private grand opening ceremony kicked off with a brass band and concluded with a performance by aerial dancers, who leaped from the peak of the 1,300-foot-tall skyscraper and proceeded […]

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Coronavirus capital cuts could derail de Blasio’s affordable housing plan

Even more bad news for New York City: Housing advocates are sounding the alarm over the damage the nearly $1 billion in cuts to the Department of Housing Preservation and Development’s (HPD) capital budget will do to the city’s affordable housing prospects. The novel coronavirus pandemic has decimated the city budget, to the point that […]

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New York City halts public design work over budget woes

New York City is still undergoing a novel coronavirus-related freeze on all “non-essential” construction, but the Department of Design and Construction (DDC) has extended that suspension to architects working on public design projects as well. In a letter dated March 26 (one day before the AIANY town hall where the issue was broached), the agency […]

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San Francisco to rent 7,000 hotel rooms to the homeless during the coronavirus pandemic

In an effort to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and prevent hospitals from becoming overwhelmed, San Francisco Controller Ben Rosenfield announced last week that the city plans to secure 5,000 additional hotel rooms as a means of protecting and isolating unhoused individuals. This particularly vulnerable segment of the city’s population that has […]

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Cities open up streets to pedestrians as parks overcrowd

For those living in heavily impacted urban areas, life during the novel coronavirus pandemic has been spent largely confined indoors, housebound and isolated, disconnected from the typical physical places where city-dwellers tend to congregate en masse when not working. Bars, restaurants, gyms, theaters, and on have all been closed. Outdoor public space, on the other […]

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Fifteen architects and designers will advise design of Rikers Replacement jails

In October 2019, the City Council approved a controversial Uniform Land Use Review Procedure (ULURP) application for the $8.7 billion plan to construct four new smaller jails to replace the Rikers Island complex. Manhattan, Queens, Brooklyn, and the Bronx would each get a community jail building that the reformists and their supporters in the Mayor’s […]

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Where do the Democratic frontrunners stand on housing?

Although the 2020 election is a year out at the time of writing, and the first Democratic primary in Iowa is two months away, the battle to become the Dem frontrunner is becoming increasingly brutal. As the campaign field is winnowed on what seems like a daily basis, and a once sprawling cast has been […]

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