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An architect’s introduction to unemployment during the pandemic

For the duration of the coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis, AN will use this column to keep our readers up to date on how the pandemic is affecting architecture and related industries. This weekly article is meant to digest the latest major developments in the crisis and synthesize broader patterns and what they could mean for architecture […]

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Sidewalk Labs pulls the plug on its Toronto waterfront smart city

Citing “unprecedented economic uncertainty,” Daniel L. Doctoroff, chief executive of urban innovation startup and Alphabet subsidiary Sidewalk Labs, announced today that plans to move forward with the highly contentious Quayside redevelopment project on the Toronto waterfront have been nixed. Extending his gratitude to development partner Waterfront Toronto and the “countless Torontonians” who contributed to the project, […]

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A schoolyard fence proposal for Greenwich Village raises questions about creeping privatization

To screen or not to screen? That was the question before New York’s Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) on April 28, when panel members reviewed a seemingly innocuous proposal to permanently alter a chain-link fence surrounding a schoolyard in Greenwich Village. Their review turned into a larger, Jane Jacobsean-discussion about urban playgrounds in general and how […]

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CAC Live: A Tale of Two Fairs

We often hear about the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893 but rarely about Chicago’s “other” world’s fair, held 40 years later. While little remains of A Century of Progress International Exposition, we can still compare the two—and explain why one is talked about so much more often than the other is today. Host Ellen Shubart […]

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CAC Live: The Rise of the Skyscraper

Why is Chicago often considered the birthplace of the skyscraper? Explore the history of these tall buildings and discover how Chicago became a global center for high-rise design, innovation and engineering. Host Leslie Clark Lewis has been a CAC docent for more than ten years. She is Tour Director for Historic Treasures of Chicago’s Golden […]

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With biennials and triennials paused, it’s the perfect time to rethink their place

2019 was another banner year for architectural biennials and triennials. With roots in world fairs and art biennials, the architecture –ennial as a circuit has been expanding on every shore: Chicago, Oslo, Grand Rapids, Seoul, Cleveland, Istanbul, and Columbus, Indiana, were but a few places that hosted architecture and design exhibitions last year. With so […]

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L Train tunnel repairs completed ahead of schedule

A year after New York’s Governor Cuomo superseded an MTA plan that would have closed the Canarsie Tunnel that runs between Brooklyn and Manhattan entirely for 15 months, repairs to the L Train-carrying tunnel are complete. The governor touted his success this past Sunday, April 26, in an on-air press conference filled with the types […]

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Cyber-forensics team summoned after Zaha Hadid Architects cyberattack

Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) swiftly alerted authorities after falling victim to a ransomware attack last week. The London-based firm first reported the incident to investigators on April 21 after discovering confidential data had been encrypted and held hostage by a hacker or hackers who had managed to infiltrate the company’s private servers. The cyber-thief left […]

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AIANY Webinar: “Small and Tiny House Movement: 1995 to Now”

What is the Tiny House Movement? What was, and continues to be, the motivation behind its ongoing research development? What is the definition of a Tiny House? Why does the Tiny House attract so much American media interest when so few homebuyers will purchase a Tiny House and few developers will build a Tiny House […]

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Washington, D.C.’s 11th Street Bridge Park gets blessing from National Capital Planning Commission

The 11th Street Bridge Park, a vaguely High Line-y elevated park that’s eternally been in the works for Washington, D.C.’s Anacostia river-severed southeastern quadrant, has passed a major milestone by receiving the green light from the National Capital Planning Commission (NCPC). The good news was shared by the New York office of OMA, one of […]

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KOVA’s interior glass wall system is future-proofing workplace design

Brought to you by: Flexibility in the way people work and where work takes place, whether in the office or remotely, necessitates equally flexible physical environments. KOVA believes that workplaces that incorporate a balance of private enclave and collaborative space address the needs of an increasingly mobile, flexible workforce. Over the last year, the KOVA […]

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