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The McHarg Centers presents A Planet to Win: Why We Need a Green New Deal

The McHarg Center presents a public discussion with the authors of A Planet to Win: Why We Need a Green New Deal. In the twenty-first century, all politics are climate politics. The age of climate gradualism is over, as unprecedented disasters are exacerbated by inequalities of race and class. We need profound, radical change. A Green New Deal can tackle […]

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LAIR: Why do bad guys live in cool houses?

How do you know if you’re a villain? You think building on the sea floor or at the bottom of a volcano sounds good…really good. Celebrate the unreal real estate that classic spy villains call HQ. What goes into planning a place where evil plotters can freely plot? Innovative architect Chad Oppenheim of Oppenheim Architecture + Design […]

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Why don’t architects have unions?

In late August 2019, the AIA’s New York chapter hosted a panel moderated by architecture activist group The Architecture Lobby at the Center for Architecture called Firm Handbook and Best Practices for Office Policies. After all the panelists finished listing their offices’ progressive policies, including flexible work hours and codes of conduct, an audience member […]

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The U.K. launches a National Design Guide—but why?

The U.K. has released a National Design Guide to help “create beautiful, enduring and successful places.” The guide was published at the start of the month and unveiled by Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick, however, for all the “good design” the guide preaches, it is at odds with Jenrick’s actual policies. To architects and designers, the […]

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Ricardo Álvarez-Díaz on why Puerto Rico needs the help of more architects

Less than two years after Hurricane Maria hit the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico, the politics behind its recovery and rebuilding efforts have come to the forefront of national news again and again. In recent weeks, two FEMA officials were indicted and arrested for taking bribes, committing fraud, and using federal funds for personal gain.  […]

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wHY Architects’ new youth center in East Palo Alto will center the community

The work of Los Angeles based firm wHY Architects is known for its simplicity, attention to detail and ethical sourcing of building materials. As the renderings indicate, these sensibilities were all employed in the design of the nearly-completed East Palo Alto Youth Arts & Music Center (YAMC), also known as the EPACENTER. The building will […]

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Why the developer’s vision matters in the experience economy

This is the second article of AN‘s July/August 2019 print edition feature focused on development. The first, “A new breed of skyscraper threatens to devastate the fabric of New York,” can be read here. As our economy moves from one of consumerism to one of experience, the real estate industry needs to change. It’s time to […]

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Why doesn’t the U.S. design buildings to survive earthquakes?

Earthquakes have been in the news lately with increasing regularity: Southern California recently experienced a July 4th quake registering 6.4 on the Richter scale followed by one just a day later at 7.1. It’s predicted that within the week there’s an 11 percent chance that a major quake could follow, and, of course, there’s the […]

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Why are architects focusing on Notre Dame and not St. Landry Parish?

One month ago, all of Paris and people around the world watched as flames rose high into the air above France’s beloved Notre Dame Cathedral. The sight was tragic and left many asking how, why, and what next. The response was immediate and immense. Less than 48 hours after the Notre Dame fire, Prime Minister […]

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Why Arata Isozaki deserves the Pritzker

The Architect’s Newspaper is very happy that Arata Isozaki has won the 2019 Pritzker Prize, despite some grumbling to the contrary within online architectural circles. The Pritzker is about lifetime achievement, so let’s start at the beginning. Isozaki began his career studying architecture after a childhood in which he witnessed profound destruction. “[During WWII] I […]

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SILHOUETTES: WHY DO BUILDINGS TAKE DIFFERENT SHAPES?

Skyscrapers can take their shapes based on wind power, cultural symbols, or pure imagination. Kids will learn about why tall buildings are shaped differently and what factors affect a building’s silhouette. Taking inspiration from our SUPERTALL WALL, children will design creative forms and collage them together. Ages 4-7. RSVP required. […]

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The Met taps wHY for a $70 million renovation of the Rockefeller Wing

The Metropolitan Museum of Art has revealed a $70 million revamp of its Michael C. Rockefeller Wing, which hosts fine art from Africa, Oceania, and the Americas. Thai architect Kulapat Yantrasast, founder of New York-based wHY Architecture, has been selected to update the wing’s 40,000 square feet of galleries as part of a master plan […]

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Snøhetta and wHY Architecture among finalists for two Toronto parks

Several renowned North American firms, including New York-based practices Snøhetta and wHY Architecture, are among the ten finalists competing in an international competition to design two new waterfront parks in Toronto. Commissioned by Waterfront Toronto and the City of Toronto Parks, Forestry and Recreation, the projects will, when complete, add to the city’s growing collection of green […]

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Why are architecture’s major professional organizations silent on the immigrant detention debate?

A preliminary Department of Homeland Security (DHS) plan to house nearly 100,000 detained migrants across California has been shelved.

 According to a draft Navy memo reported by Time late last week, the military base at Camp Pendleton north of San Diego and the Concord Naval Weapons Station (CNWS) east of San Francisco were being eyed as […]

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Why are there so few disabled architects and architecture students?

In the United States, people with disabilities in the architecture profession and architectural academia are statistically invisible. Neither the American Institute of Architects, the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards, nor the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture collect data on the number of architects or architecture students in the United States who self-identify with […]

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Why we need architecture critics more than ever

Earlier this week we learned that Los Angeles Times architecture critic Christopher Hawthorne would be stepping down to take on the city’s newly-created role of Chief Design Officer. The move is a bold, encouraging one that should go a long way toward, as Hawthorne put it, “raising the quality of public architecture and urban design […]

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Why is mass-market fashion brand COS engaging the design world?

What does it say about London-based clothing brand COS that it is targeting architects and designers? Its price points ($99 to $225 for a men’s dress shirt) are relatively accessible when compared to many other boutique or more explicitly luxury-oriented brands. At the same time, within the mass-market fast-fashion sector, COS has a different approach […]

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Why are we wrecking our best modernist landscapes?

This is a feature article from Issue 8 of The Architect’s Newspaper. If you’ve seen the movie Columbus, you’ll remember, among all the nerdy dialogue about modernist bank branches and James Polshek’s buildings, that scene where the two protagonists passionately discuss the Dan Kiley landscape outside the Eero Saarinen–designed Miller House. No? That’s because landscape […]

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