CLOSE AD ×

CRÈME serves up some Bangkok street culture at New York’s latest Thai haunt

Sunken Fare

CRÈME serves up some Bangkok street culture at New York’s latest Thai haunt

CRÈME design studio founding principal Jun Aizaki added linear paint elements to the restaurant’s walls. (Nicole Franzen)

For the design of Wayla, a new eatery in Manhattan’s Lower East Side neighborhood, local practice CRÈME took its cues from the lively street markets that rope across Bangkok. Jun Aizaki, the founding principal of the Brooklyn-based studio, worked with a close-knit team of restaurateurs and investors to develop this multifaceted project. His infusion of objet d’art sourced from Thailand’s famous flea markets is an ode to the bustling metropolis. 

Reminiscing on the design of the space, Aizaki recalls a time before social distancing, when he conjured up a unique combination of architectural elements that encourage gathering. “It’s everything we can’t do right now.” With a limited budget, he opted to play up the tenement building’s vernacular characteristics—the deliberately visible water pipes; raw, unpainted brick walls, and monolithic concrete floors. “These elements became unwittingly part of the environment, a surprise that we intentionally emphasized to distinguish the space and tie it all together.” These motifs recur throughout as an overarching aesthetic framing a myriad of community spaces.

Read the full profile on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.