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Atelier Barda’s latest residential project strikes a sinister note until one ventures inside

Tudor Extruder

Atelier Barda’s latest residential project strikes a sinister note until one ventures inside

Implementing an otherwise underused backyard, the home’s new extension is practically hidden from the street. (Maxime Desbiens)

At this suburban Montreal home, appearances deceive. Dating from the 1920s, the Tudor-style house presents a prim face to its neighbors, giving no indication as to what lurks behind. Walking past the house along the street, however, one can spot a dark protuberance extending from the gable roof. For such a quaint subdivision, where the homes adopt an eclectic array of architectural styles, the shadowy mass—in fact, a compact addition clad in charred wood siding and topped by a copper-shingled roof—gives off an almost eerie feeling.

Inside the 360-square-foot annex, the mood is light and airy, thanks to the high ceilings and white walls. It has only one designated function, accommodating a kitchen (complete with a monolithic terrazzo island) and dining area. But Antonio Di Bacco, principal at Atelier Barda, the local architecture firm behind the project, suggested it also functions at a rhetorical level. “The backyards of these homes have historically played a secondary role to their front yards and facades,” he explained. “In a sense, our approach…was a critique [of that convention].”

Explore both sides of the latest addition to the Atelier Barda portfolio, a dualistic dark home, on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.

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